Taste have we lost it?

Taste, how do you like your food

Are we becoming a society that has lost its taste?

By taste. I do not mean in the way we dress, or the amount of dubious celebrity gossip we devour on a daily basis. I mean, in this instance, our taste buds.

We all appear to be concerned with perfection in every thing, which in itself is commendable, but when it comes to food, what may be perfection on the outside, is not necessarily so on the inside.

We seemed to be overly obsessed with gluten free, dairy free, going vegetarian or vegan & eating raw or natural foods, food miles etc, however, when it comes to what were are really putting into our bodies, we appear to ignore, what additives or preservatives are in a product & just munch away, as long as it looks perfect & suits our skewed values.

Last week, meat was discovered in two major supermarkets vegetarian ready meals. Wether this was an error on the production line, or an additive – such as gelatine – that had been overlooked in the recipe, it is yet to be known. The point is if we really cared about what goes into our mouths, we would be cooking our own meals from fresh natural ingredients, to ensure our meals are healthy, natural & fresh, not leave it celebrities & mass food producers, too persuade us that their products are the “best thing since sliced bread”.

Food,bread, baking, bakery,homemade
Homemade. The best thing since sliced bread

It is strange, that as we have become so obsessed with food & diet, we seem to have a total disregard for the health & nutritional values of the very stuff that keeps our bodies both healthy & alive.

From my small converted Stable Kitchen in Wiltshire, I endeavour to provide my customers with, fresh totally homemade food, in which I also take the nutritional value into account.

Not for me bowls of the ubiquitous Coleslaw – limp white cabbage & soggy old carrots – smothered in artificial high calorie mayo.

Food,salad, healthy eating,fresh food
Healthy salads with homemade herb dressing
Super homemade salads
Food,homemade,bread,bluecheese,salad
Homemade blue cheese Bread & salad

All my breads are homemade, I offer five different varieties, all made with spelt & rye flours. Soups, in the winter, are all made with fresh local veg & my cakes are all made from my own recipes, being low in fat & sugar, some gluten free. I do not use butter cream or mirror glazes on my cakes, the cake itself needs to be full of taste & you really do not need the extra fat & sugar to mask the flavour. Ok, I know it may be ascetically pleasing, but your body won’t thank you for it, in more ways than one.

On a final point, a yummy, glutenfree Mummy, asked yesterday “What cake do you have” I pointed to the Strawberry & Lemon Mousse cake, pictured in the header of this blog & she replied “That’s not really a child’s cake” When I inquired as to why she said it hasn’t got any chocolate sweets & artificial gold stars on. Ahgggggggg.

Bread, a Low fodmap Diet no no?

The one thing I would miss on a Low Fodmap Diet would be bread. I love bread, any type of bread. It is said that bread is the staff of life & for me, its certainly true. I am not talking sliced white, wholemeal or fluffy processed baps, I’m talking rustic, nutty granary bread baked by a local baker [I hate the term Artisan] or home made, not the mass produced items, found in Supermarkets. Give me a metre of a proper french stick, a large lump of Sourdough or a Stilton & Walnut Loaf, together with some tangy cheese or home made pate with a side of olives, some crunchy homegrown lettuce, ripe juicy tomatoes & I am in heaven. Of course, I would also like a large glass of red or white, depending on the season, to wash it all down.

Bread, is one of the things I found, caused me great discomfort. A pair of jeans would feel quite comfortable, until I ate some bread. One slice of toast in the morning would have me thinking I had put on half a kilo in 5 mins. So, I decided to experiment with my own recipe Spelt bread. Although Spelt is not Gluten Free, it is lower in Gluten than other flours, due to the fact that it has a different molecular make up, to the gluten contained in modern wheat. Spelt is higher in fibre than most forms of wheat, its naturally occurring gluten is more water soluble, is degraded by heat & easily broken down, by the kneading action of bread making, which makes it easier to digest.

gluten, linseeds, low foodmap, bread, spelt
Home made Low Gluten Spelt & Rye Rolls

Although not suitable for Celiacs, I have found this bread, which I now make every day, is perfect for me. In addition Spelt has more vitamins than wholewheat flour. I vary the changes with this bread to which I also add a vegetable, carrot one day or beetroot the next. Seeds are another favourite.

As well as bread I also make my own pastry with Spelt & Rye flours. Pastry is very easy to make in a food processor or mixer. It takes about the same amount of time, that it takes to fight your way into a shop bought packet of pastry. You can make up a large batch of pastry, weigh it into portions & freeze. You can be sure that your homemade pastry or bread is full of natural ingredients & does not contain any additives, preservatives or large amounts of sugar and salt.

food, bread, pastry, rye, spelt, low fodmap diet,
A vegetarian feast

As I have said in a previous blog Food, what can I eat. You have to experiment & discover what is right for you. If you cook healthy home made food from fresh natural ingredients, you can be sure you are not intolerant to the vast array of “extras” which are added to today’s unnaturally processed foods. But, that’s another story.

Food, what can I eat.

The Low Fodmap diet. Day 3.

Food, what can I eat? Now that is the question. When I first started researching The Low Fodmap diet, after a quick glance, I wondered just what I could eat. Digging deeper, I discovered it was a case of noshing less, of what I had been eating & tweaking a few things here & there.  I have always been a healthy eater, consuming salads, veg & pulses by the kilo in one sitting. BAD MOVE. I need to cut down or remove a few of these bloat producing veggies from my diet.

The Low Fodmap diet is all about removing from your diet [for a period of time], foods which you know cause you discomfort.  You then start eating the foods suggested by the research which has been carried out the “Safe Foods. This method allows you to see if your symptoms persist, ease or disappear. Gradually, you then reintroducing foods back into your diet from the suggested Fodmap food group list.

There are several things to observe, before embarking on the low Fodmap diet.

  • You should consult you doctor first to ensure you do not have any prevailing medical conditions.
  • Unless you are knowledgeable as to what a “healthy, nutritious diet ” consists of, you should consult a dietitian to ensure you are eating enough carbohydrates, protein, vegetables, vitamins & minerals, etc to keep your body healthy.
  • Beware of were you gather your information from.  A Google search has provided me with numerous sites dealing with Low Fodmap lists, of foods which are considered “OK to Eat” & those to “Avoid” many seem to contradict each other & sometimes even themselves on their lists.

As an example of the above, it is generally thought that lactose found in milk & dairy products, is thought to be a sugar to be avoided when starting the Low Fodmap diet. However, on the same chart, two of the foods on the “safe” chart are butter & cream, both of which are made with milk!   Check your information carefully. A good place to start is with NHS.UK 

food, mushrooms, bloating, ibs. low fodmap
Stuff me.

Some of the foods I have discovered on my Low Fodmap diet experiment so far are:

  • Mushrooms
  • Potatoes but Sweet Potatoes seem OK
  • Onions (White)
  • Garlic
  • Beetroot
  • Lentils
  • Asparagus
  • Fruit Juices
  • Couscous
  • Dried Apricots
  • Brocolli

Should you eat the cake in the photo above on the Low Fodmap diet?  Find out the answer tomorrow.

Whats it all about

The Low Fodmap Diet.

So, what is it all about?  FODMAP stands for Fermentable Oligosaccharides Disaccharides Monosaccarides & Polyols.

Fermentable: Carbohydrates. are the sugars which are easily fermented in your digestive system. They include all of the short chains of sugar molecules mentioned below:

Oligosaccharides:  Carbohydrates. Are a saccharide polymer containing a small number of monosaccharides [simple sugars] which can have many different functions. Being Non digestible food ingredients, they selectively stimulate the growth of prebiotic bacteria in the colon. We cannot digest and absorb these.

Disaccharides: Carbohydrates. Double sugars Formed when two monosaccharides are joined together & a molecule of water is removed from the structure. [hydrolysis].   Three common examples being sucrose, lactose [discomfort causing sugar] & maltrose.

Monosaccarides:  The most basic form of Carbohydrates. Any of the class of sugars, that cannot be hydrolysed to give a simpler sugar. Some have a sweet taste examples include glucose [dextrose], fructose & galactose.

Polyols:  Sugar free sweeteners. Carbohydrates, but not sugars. Used volume for volume in the same amount as sugar is used. Unlike aspartame , saccharin & sucralose which are used in very small amounts.  They are included in a variety of foods we consume each day.

The low Fodmap diet was developed in Australia at Monach University by gastroenterology professor Peter Gibson and Dietician Sue Shepherd & has been adapted for the UK by reserchers at Kings College London.

Now you all understand the meanings of the catchy acronym. Tomorrow we will be investigating some of the low Fodmap foods & the care you should take when embarking on this diet.

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Bloating Brocolli

If you have been. Thank you for reading. Until Tomorrow.

References:

Dr Sarah Brewer.

shepherdworks.com

Kings College. London

The wake up call. Day One

My wake up call this morning, a cup of black tea. For today’s day one of twenty eight, in which I embark on my low Fodmap diet.

After suffering from severe bloating for more years than I care to remember I have decided to try, by a series of exclusions, to try & find out which particular food groups have the most effect on my condition.

low fodmap, diet, ibs, food groups
You can alter the set of the sails, but you can’t alter the direction of the wind!

Visiting my doctor, she decided to take a precautionary course of action, referring me to the hospital for an Ultrasound Scan, to rule out Ovarian Cancer [close family history], which can, in some cases, mimic IBS. Luckly, my results came back normal. It was time to talk about IBS. Having explained that I had identified various foods, which caused me a lot of discomfort, she asked me if I had heard of the Low Fodmap diet. I hadn’t. However, having studied Nutrition & Food Science at University some years ago, my curiosity was aroused & there dear reader, this blog was born. After some in-depth research & consulting my long redundant books on complex & alcohol sugars I have decided to share my findings with you.

I will be charting my progress, telling you what foods I have avoided & later, what I have reintroduced. As we go along I will be also giving you recipes to hopefully inspire you into trying The Low Fodmap diet for yourself.

Low fodmap, diet, protein, ibs, bloating
Tonight Dinner. Tuna Steak, Salad & white rice, Dressed with herbs & a little Olive oil.

 

Fodmap foods Dietary Advice & own recipes

Welcome to my new blog Fodmap foods, dietary advice & own recipes. Having been diagnosed with IBS, after many years of suffering, I hope you will follow me both here on Instagram fodmapfood & Facebook fodmapfoods as I embark on my fodmap diet. Fodmap stands for: Fermentable oligosaccarides (wheat, onion, garlic); disaccharides (milk, ice cream); monosaccarides (apples, pears, honey); & polyols (mushrooms, apricots). All of these strange sounding names, of which the foods in brackets are examples, are all types of short chain carbohydrates & alcohol sugars found in every day foods, but which are poorly absorbed by the the small intestine & researchers such as King’s College London & Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust now believe are responsible for discomfort & bloating.

It is not just the avoidance of these FOD’s which will help in the reduction of symptoms. Care must be taken to also avoid those ready made foods containing even small amounts of FOD’s.

Starting on Monday 2nd April for eight weeks I will be posting on this blog my daily diet & a weekly recipe. I will also be explaining more about A low FODMAP diet.

So girls, give up the expensive green tea capsules & the faddy diets & try a scientifically based diet, to see if it helps you.

fodmap, food, recipes, recipe development, diet
Recipe creation